2440 Stateville Blvd., Suite 140, Salisbury, NC | 704-637-0712
Patient Information
Our Services
Dental Terms
Dental Health
Meet Us
Contact Us

Dental Terms

What is an oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS)?

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are dentists specializing in surgery of the mouth, face and jaws. After four years of dental school, surgeons receive four to seven years of hospital-based surgical and medical training, preparing them to do a wide range of procedures including all types of surgery of both the bones and soft tissues of the face, mouth and neck.

What is a Periodontist?

Periodontists are dentists who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of periodontal (gum) disease. They have had extensive training with two additional years of study after dental school. As specialists they devote their time, energy and skill to helping patients care for their gums. A periodontist is one of the
eight dental specialists recognized by the American Dental Association.

Why is your dentist referring you to a Periodontist?

Your dentist has determined that your gums require special attention. The periodontist and dentist work together as a team to provide you with the highest level of care. They will combine their experience to recommend the best treatment available to you while keeping each other informed on your progress. By referring you to the specialist, your dentist is showing a strong commitment to your dental health.

What is an Endodontist?

The Endodontist examines, diagnoses and treats diseases and destructive processes, including injuries and abnormalities of dental pulps and periapical tissues of the teeth.

Endodontists examine patients and interpret radiographs and pulp tests to determine pulp vitality and periapical tissue condition. They evaluate their findings and prescribe a method of treatment to prevent loss of teeth.

What is a Prosthodontist?

The prosthodontist examines and diagnoses disabilities caused by loss of teeth and supporting structures. They formulate and execute treatment plans for the construction of corrective prostheses to restore proper function and esthetics of the mouth, face, and jaw.

What is a Pediatric Dentist?

A pediatric dentist has at least two additional years of training beyond dental school. The additional training focuses on management and treatment of a child’s developing teeth, child behavior, physical growth and development, and the special needs of children’s dentistry. Although either type of dentist
is capable of addressing your child’s oral health care needs, a pediatric dentist, his or her staff, and even the office décor are all geared to care for children and to put them at ease. If your child has special needs, care from a pediatric dentist should be considered.

What is an Orthodontist?

An orthodontist prevents and treats mouth, teeth, and jaw problems. Using braces, retainers, and other devices, an orthodontist helps straighten a person's teeth and correct the way the jaws line up.

Orthodontists treat kids for many problems, including having crowded or overlapping teeth or having problems with jaw growth and tooth development. These tooth and jaw problems may be caused by tooth decay, losing baby teeth too soon, accidents, or habits like thumb sucking. These problems can also be genetic or inherited.

So why would you go to the orthodontist?

Your dentist or one of your parents might recommend it because they see a problem with your teeth or jaws. Or a kid who doesn't like the way his or her teeth look might ask to see an orthodontist.

Dental Dictionary

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K


A collection of pus. Usually forms because of infection.


A tooth or tooth structure which is responsible for the anchorage of a bridge or a denture.


A silver filling material.


An agent that causes temporary loss of sensation/feeling.


The front position.


The end of the root.


No micro-organism.


Wear of teeth due to activities such as chewing.


An injury that causes a tooth to be completely knocked out of the mouth.


A kind of dental x-ray which is taken with the teeth bite together. The main function of this kind of x-ray is to detect cavities in between teeth and height of bone support.


Whitening of teeth.


A prosthesis which is fixed inside the mouth to replace missing teeth.


Teeth grinding.


The third tooth from the middle of the jaw. There are four of them. They are the longest teeth in humans.

Canker sore

An ulceration with yellow base and red border in mouth. It can be caused by trauma or herpes simplex virus.


Tooth decay.


A hole on the tooth.


A model of teeth.


The process of "gluing" the appliance/prosthesis on the associated area.


An anti-microbial agent. It is available in many forms such as gels and rinses. It is an effective agent in controlling gum diseases.


A metal arm extended from a removable partial denture. It helps to hold onto natural tooth structure and thus provide anchorage for the denture.

Cold sore

An ulcer or blister on lip. A form of herpes simplex.


White filling.


An abnormal bite relationship of upper and lower jaw. The lower teeth/tooth align toward the check/ lip side more than the upper teeth/tooth.

Crown (porcelain/plastic/metal)

A crown is almost like a "cap" on a tooth. It covers the tooth partially or totally above the gum to restore its function and outlook.


The rotten part of the tooth.


A branch of medicine that involves diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of any disease concerning teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures.


The position, type, and number of teeth in upper and lower jaw.


(Immediate/complete/partial) (overdenture, temporary)
An artificial object to replace missing teeth and their neighboring structures. There are many different types of denture to satisfy different treatment requirements and patient preferences.


The person who specializes in fabricating dentures. A Denturist is not responsible for making any type of diagnosis or carrying out any other treatment (e.g. removing teeth).


A procedure to reduce the sensitivity of teeth.


The process of identifying dental disease.


The space between two adjacent teeth.


A direction indication in the mouth. It indicates the direction away from the middle of the jaw.


No teeth.


A department of dentistry involving diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental pulp (where the nerves and blood vessels are inside the tooth).


The process of the tooth appearing in the mouth.


The action of cutting something off.


When a tooth may be pushed partially out of the socket.


A restoration placed on a tooth to restore its function and appearance.


A temporary denture to replace missing teeth during the waiting period for long term treatment.


A thread/tape that goes in between teeth for cleaning.


A compound of fluorine (an element) which be put in different forms such as water, gels, and rinses to strengthen teeth.

Fluoride Treatment

Teeth treatment with fluoride agents like gel or rinse. It helps to prevent tooth decay.


When a cusp of a tooth becomes weakened, a fracture may result. It is possible for the crack to extend further into the root and damage to the pulp is commonplace.


A metal skeleton of a removable partial denture to support the false teeth and the plastic attachments.


The mildest form of gum disease: inflammation of gum. The earliest sign is bleeding gum.




Stop bleeding.


A condition where a tooth is not able to come in normally or is stuck underneath another tooth or bone.


A device (usually "screw-like") put in the jaw bone to support a false tooth, a denture or a bridge.


A mold taken by some jelly-like material loaded on a tray.


The cutting edge of front teeth.


The four upper and lower front teeth.


A restoration (usually gold, composite or ceramics) fabricated in the lab that cements on a tooth like a missing puzzle piece. It helps to restore the normal function and outlook of the tooth.


The space between two adjacent teeth.



L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z


The side of the tooth towards the tongue.


The side of the tooth towards the middle of the jaw.


The last three upper and lower teeth on both sides of the mouth.


A device to be worn in the mouth. Depending on the design of it, it prevents injury to teeth and/or jaw during teeth grinding or sport events.


A mouthguard which is worn at night time.


The biting surface of the back teeth.


The way how the upper and lower teeth close together.


A restoration covers the entire biting surface of a tooth.

Open bite

The situation where the upper teeth not able to contact the opposing lower teeth.


A special field in dentistry which involves diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of bite abnormalities or facial irregularities.

Over bite

The overlap of upper teeth and lower teeth when they close together.


The portion of filling material that hangs beyond the border of the cavity.


The roof of the mouth.

Panoramic Radiograph

An x-ray film used to obtain the wide view of upper and lower jaw and their associated structures.


An opening on a tooth or other oral structure.


The surrounding of the bottom of the root of a tooth.


A specialty of dentistry involves diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of gum (periodontal) disease.

Permanent teeth

Adult's teeth. The first permanent tooth usually comes in around 6 years old.


A piece of "nail-like" metal. It usually is used for better retention of a filling.


A process to make the tooth or filling or other denture smooth and glossy.


The false tooth in a bridge or denture to replace the missing tooth.


A big pin which can be made with different materials such as metal or carbon. Its function usually is to support a big buildup on a tooth.


Located at the back.


An approval from the particular authority (usually insurance company in dentistry) before any action (treatment) is carried out.


Medication needing to be taken before treatment.


The two teeth located in front of the molar.


A written statement (from a doctor to a pharmacist) regarding the type, the amount and direction of the use of a medication for a patient. In dentistry, a prescription can also be a written statement for preparation of an appliance from a dentist to a lab technician.

Primary teeth

Baby teeth.


The procedure of teeth polishing. It also means the prevention of diseases.


An artificial part to replace missing teeth and their associated structures.


A specialty of dentistry involving diagnosis, treatment planning, and fabrication of artificial parts to replace missing teeth and their associated structures.


The innermost part of a tooth. It contains nerves and blood vessels inside a tooth.


The removal of the whole pulp inside a tooth.


The removal of the top part of the pulp inside a tooth.



An x-ray picture.


The regular checkup and teeth cleaning appointment.


The process of "gluing" the appliance/prosthesis back on the associated area.


An item a dentist uses to restore the normal function of a tooth or an area in the mouth. It can be a filling, a crown, a bridge, etc.


A device used for maintaining the position of teeth in the jaw in orthodontic treatment.


The process of repeating the root canal treatment.


The bottom part of tooth. It anchors the tooth to its supporting units.

Root canal

The canal that runs inside the root of the tooth. It contains the nerves and blood vessels inside the tooth.

Root canal treatment

A treatment for the root canal inside the tooth.

Root planing

The action of cleaning the root area of teeth.

Rubber dam

A rubber sheet that fits around teeth. It isolates the treatment area from the rest of the oral cavity.


The action of cleaning teeth below the gumline.


A thin layer of plastic-like material covering the grooves and pits on a tooth to prevent cavity.


The use of medication to calm a patient.

Space Maintainer

An appliance to maintain the space between teeth.


An appliance or a material to prevent movement of a mobile part.

Tempromandibular Joint (TMJ)

The joint that links the two parts of the jaw.


An outgrowth of bone. It usually develops on the roof of the mouth or around the premolar area on the lower jaw.



A layer of tooth-colored material (can be porcelain, composite, or ceramics) that attaches to the front of the tooth. It is usually used to improve the appearance of the tooth.

Wisdom tooth

The eighth (also the last) tooth from the middle of the jaw.


Dry mouth



Return to top

Contact Us

Home  |   Patient Information  |   Our Services  |   Dental Terms  |   Dental Health  |   Meet Us  |   Contact Us